Forest Garden Trees

Willows, Common Osier (Salix viminalis)

Among the first trees we planted in the forest garden area of Marlpit Community Garden were a double row of willows along the western side of the garden.

Now over two years old the willows are developing well.willow flower Marlpit

They are incredibly useful trees. In this position they will help to screen the garden from the houses and this section of Marriots Way. By coppicing, we will prevent them growing too tall and overshadowing the garden, as well as obtaining wood for hurdles. We can run crafts workshops using the willows whips for basketry and sculpture, and Mahesh has plans to experiment in producing an alternative to netting to protect our plants against birds. Another idea is making growing structures such as wigwams and domes from the whips.willow at Marlpit

In addition the catkins provide a source of pollen early in the year for our honey bees.

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Local History

Cecile Bidet,  the owner of The Marlpit Arms pub, due to open later this year, planted a mulberry tree in our forest garden in memory of Mary Ann Cross who ran the Lower Farm, which included the site of Marlpit Community Garden, from 1854 to 1876

Cecile Bidet, owner of The Marlpit Arms, planting a mulberry tree in our forest garden in memory of Mary Ann Cross.


Cecile Bidet, the owner of The Marlpit Arms pub, due to open later this year, planting a mulberry tree in our forest garden in memory of Mary Ann Cross who ran the Lower Farm, which included the site of Marlpit Community Garden, for twenty two years from 1854 to 1876.
Cecile, who has been researching into the history of the pub, discovered that it was originally the farmhouse. When Mary Ann’s husband, John Cross, died in 1854, she stepped in and ran the farm until her infant son, James, came of age.
“Of the 7000 farmers in Norfolk at that time only 3 per cent were women,” Cecile said. “I think planting a tree is a good way to honour her.”

The pub was originally the farmhouse, and when Mary Ann's husband, John Cross, died in 1854, she stepped in and ran the farm until her infant son, James, came of age.

The pub was originally the farmhouse, and when Mary Ann’s husband, John Cross, died in 1854, she stepped in and ran the farm until her infant son, James, came of age.

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LOTS MORE TREES TO PLANT

The orchard is now quite extensive, with apples and pears on the south and plums and gages on the north. The Forest Garden is in the distance.

The orchard is now quite extensive, with apples and pears on the south and plums and gages on the north. The Forest Garden is in the distance.


Orchard and Forest Gardening Tree Planting

Nine people turned out on Saturday, 23rd January to plant trees in the orchard and Frest Grden at Marlpit Community Garden.
Lunch was rice, dahl and cake, provided by Amy, and was very welcome.

We made a good start, planting English varieties of apples, pears, plums and gages to replace those trees that had succumbed to attack by muntjac deer, or not made it from last year for other reasons. All the fruit trees have since been supplied with tree guards against the deer.

Leptospermum scoparium, Manuka Myrtle

Leptospermum scoparium, Manuka

Planting continued all week in the forest garden of more exotic trees and shrubs and is now complete. The trees planted were mulberry, peach, persimmon, almond, cherry, Siberian pea tree, sweet chestnut, yellowhorn and blue beans. Shrubs were chokeberry, goji, jostaberry, Worcesterberry, bog myrtle and manuka and also three varieties of grapevine.

Lycium barbarum, Goji Big Lifeberry - bears red fruit to be eaten fresh. The young shoots and leaves may be cooked as a vegetable

Lycium barbarum, Goji Big Lifeberry – bears red fruit to be eaten fresh. The young shoots and leaves may be cooked as a vegetable

The fruit and nuts from these trees and shrubs will provide us with familiar and new tastes which should result in some interesting additions to our dishes and preserves in a year or two.

The leaves and nuts from bog myrtle are used to flavour dishes and wax from the leaves can be used to make candles.

Tish
The first crocus to flower in the Forest Garden, 'Cream Beauty', photographed on 25th January.

The first crocus to flower in the Forest Garden, ‘Cream Beauty’, photographed on 25th January.

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10th November 2015

Chris and Teresa planting trees
TREE PLANTING AT MARLPIT

Tuesday turned out to be a lovely mild day for the group that gathered to plant trees round the borders of Marlpit Community Garden. They were “whips” donated by the Woodland Trust. One team concentrated on clearing undergrowth and planting a mixture of hawthorns, rowans and cherry trees. Others focused on clearing round previously planted trees and planting dogwood near the entrance. We also have hazel trees to join those already established at the far end of the site and birches that we can use to start a small birch grove.

After a busy morning the group enjoyed a relaxing meal.
A welcome lunch break

LOTS MORE TREES TO PLANT…

TREE PLANTING DAYS

TUESDAY 17TH NOVEMBER

SATURDAY 28TH NOVEMBER (On this day please bring a dish to share)


MARLPIT MULCH

Cardboard needed for mulching in the Forest Garden at Marlpit Community
Garden. If you have non-shiny cardboard please bring it along after 10am
on a Tuesday or Saturday morning. Thank you.

Tish

TREE PLANTING

A few of us met to plant trees at Marlpit Community Garden on Tuesday 10 November 2015.
Click on any photo and see a slideshow.

Trees ready for planting at Marlpit Community Garden

Trees ready for planting – the plan is Dogwood by the gate; Hazel in the coppice; Hawthorn, Rowan and birch in the hedges.

These are the spiral tree-guards.

Corylus avelana, Hazel to plant for coppicing in years to come.
Possibly Cherry?

Possibly Cherry?

Very young whips of Cornus sanguinea, Common Dogwood, to be planted near the gate.

Betula pendula, Birch will be used in the hedge and herbally.

Very young saplings are known as “whips”.

Sorbus aucuparia, Rowan – food for bees and birds.

What did I find in this discarded crisp bag?

Clearing up litter by the dung heap, what's this?

Clearing up litter by the dung heap, what’s this?

Lunch was provided by Mahesh and enjoyed by all present. As it was still sunny, we ate in the shade of the shelter and enjoyed the view of trees and horses and occasional birds (see Chris Keene’s item on the blog.)

Jim